Millets Basket Close Menu Search Store Finder Twitter Facebook Instagram Blog Engage voice search

Recommended Routes: The Scottish Highlands & Islands

Please follow government guidance on Covid-19 travel restrictions at all times and enjoy the outdoors responsibly.

We believe there is no better way to explore Great Britain than on foot or bike. To prove that point, we’ve teamed up with Ordnance Survey, the national mapping agency, to share the best routes they recommend in Great Britain.

In this guide we lace up ready to explore the paths and trails which make the The Scottish Highlands and surrounding islands a spectacular place for adventurers. We’ve split the routes into categories i.e. lake, hill, mountain, with grade levels (Easy, Moderate, Challenging, Mountain). You'll also find the Ordnance Survey map you’ll need; plus, you can explore the route virtually using the recorded ‘Fly Through Videos’. Use the Navigation below to select Lake, Hill or Mountain routes.

 

A Quick Guide to Exploring Britain Responsibly

Lake

Hill

Mountain

Forest

Coast

 

Recommended Routes in The Scottish Highlands & Islands

Lace up your walking boots, pack your snacks and join us as we explore the best routes for walkers, cyclists and families in The Lake District.

 

Lake

 

Torridon - Loch Clair & Loch Coulin

Grade: Moderate

Terrain: Countryside/Valley

Distance: 9.5km | Approx. Time: 2:07 - 2:30 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer Active 433

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

This walk around Loch Clair & Coulin offers an almost-level circuit route with breath-taking views of Beinn Eighe and Liathach from across the water. Beinn Eighe and Liathach are both Munros, a Munro being a Scottish Mountain over 3,000 feet in height. The two closest settlements are Torridon village and Kinlochewe. The Torridon Hotel is a must visit, offering a selection of accommodation to suit everyone, and food from fine dining in its restaurant, to pub meals in the bar area. Torridon Outdoors which is located on the hotel grounds, offers a selection of outdoor activities for beginners to experts, from walking in the hills to Munro bagging, and mountain biking to sea kayaking. Even on short walks around the area it is possible to spot deer and pine martens, and seals and otters around the shores of Torridon village.

 

Loch Morlich Circular Walk

Grade: Easy

Terrain: Countryside/Valley

Distance: 5.1km | Approx. Time: 1:00 - 1:30 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer OL57

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

A spectacular circular walk around Loch Morlich at the foot of the Cairngorms mountains. Loch Morlich is a freshwater loch surrounded by forests and sandy beaches and only located a few miles away from Aviemore. This circular route can be either walked or cycled by Mountain bike. Loch Morlich Watersports offer kayak, canoe, stand-up paddleboard (SUP) hire and windsurfing activities. Located just up the road is the Cairngorm Reindeer Centre, where they organise trips to visit the free-ranging herd of reindeer. This area offers lots of other beautiful areas to explore!

Loch Muick Circular Walk

Grade: Moderate

Terrain: Valley

Distance: 12km | Approx. Time: 2:45 - 3:15 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer Active OL53

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

Loch Muick is located at the foot of Lochnagar which is a Munro, or Scottish mountain above 3,000 feet. The loch is an upland, freshwater loch lying 8 miles south west of Ballater in Aberdeenshire and is within the boundary of the Balmoral Estate. The circular walk around the loch offers outstanding views to Lochnagar and the Cairngorm National Park, and the area has a variety of wildlife including deer and grouse. Located close by is Ballater which is a picturesque Victorian village and Balmoral Palace, the most famous of the Queen’s Scottish stately homes and one of her favourite places.

Hill

 

Glen Nevis & Steall Falls

Grade: Easy

Terrain: Valley

Distance: 5.4km | Approx. Time: 1:40 - 2:00 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 392

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

Glen Nevis is a beautiful glen located in Lochaber and is bordered to the south by the Mamore range, and to the north by the highest mountain in the British Isles, Ben Nevis. The glen is home to one of the highest waterfalls in Scotland, Steall Falls. The Glen is filled with both human and natural history. High above the Glen on a steep rising knoll is the Iron Age fort called, Dun Deardail. Fort William is the closet town to the glen and can be used an ideal base to explore the area. Fort William is also the start of the Caledonian canal which connects the town to Inverness via the famous Loch Ness. The Caledonian canal can be sailed by boat or walked/cycled following the Great Glen Way.

.

Pap of Glencoe Walk

Grade: Challenging

Terrain: Hill/Mountain

Distance: 7.6 km | Approx. Time: 3:00 - 3.30 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 384

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

The Pap of Glencoe is a mountain on the northern side of Glen Coe, in the Highlands of Scotland, and locals refer to the mountain as The Pap. The Pap has distinctive conical shape, and it lies at the western end of the Aonach Eagach ridge, directly above the point where the River Coe merges with Loch Leven. The Pap provides wonderful views over the surrounding mountains and lochs. Glencoe Village is the main settlement in Glen Coe, and was one of the MacDonald clan settlements at the time of the Glencoe Massacre. From the village you can take a short walk to the monument created at Signal Rock where it is reported that the MacDonalds would light a fire to warn villagers of danger.

 

Mountain

 

Ben Nevis 

Grade: Challenging

Terrain: Mountain

Distance: 15km | Approx. Time: 5:30 - 6:30 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 392

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in the British Isles and is close to the town of Fort William (also known to be the outdoor capital of the UK). The summit of Ben Nevis is a height of 1,345 metres (4,413 ft) above sea level and the Old Observatory sits at the summit, which was opened in 1883, It provided hourly meteorological data for almost 20 years and closed in 1904. Ben Nevis is a rewarding challenge and should be tackled with the appropriate kit, as the weather can change and be unpredictable on the higher ground. Nearby Nevis Range also offers mountain biking for most of the year, and skiing/snowboarding over the winter months when snow is on the slopes.

 

Old Man of Storr 

Grade: Challenging

Terrain: Mountain

Distance: 7.7km | Approx. Time: 2:40 - 3:15 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 408

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

The Storr - the high point of the Trotternish Ridge, forming the backbone of the magnificent Isle of Skye. The glorious views from the Storr, take in much of Skye's eastern seaboard with the rolling Red Cuillin and the iconic Black Cuillin forming an incredible backdrop to this superb walk. The Old Man of Storr is a large standing formation standing at 719 meters high. 7 miles south of the Old Man of Storr is Portree, the largest town on Skye. Portee is set round its natural harbour and fringed by high ground and cliffs, the town is a popular holiday destination, and the harbour continues to be used by fishing boats. Not too far away at Brother Point, fossilised dinosaur foot prints can be found, when the tide is out and try your best to spot them.

 

Ben Ledi Circular Walk 

Grade: Challenging

Terrain: Mountain

Distance: 9.8m | Approx. Time: 3:15 - 4:15 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer OL46

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

Ben Ledi is a mountain that sits at 879 metres high, and is classified as a Corbett; a Corbett is a Scottish hill between 2500 and 2999 feet high with a drop of at least 500 feet (152.4m) on all sides. Ben Ledi sits beside Loch Lubnaig in the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park and makes an excellent viewpoint. The area is famous for its expansive lochs which include Loch Katrine and Loch Lomond. Callender is the closest town, situated on the River Teith, and the town serves as the eastern gateway to the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, the first National Park in Scotland. It is often referred to as the "Gateway to the Highlands". Loch Katrine is steeped in history and worth exploring with a loch cruise aboard the Sir Walter Scott Steamship.

Forest

Loch Ard Circular Walk

Grade: Easy

Terrain: Countryside

Distance: 5.7km | Approx. Time: 1:15 - 1:40 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer OL46

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

Loch Ard Forest is part of the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park and stretches from just north of Drymen almost to the banks of Loch Katrine. There is a variety of landscapes, wildlife, flora and fauna and the area is managed by the Forestry Commission. Within the forest there are various other routes that can be explored on foot or bike. Aberfoyle is where this route starts; the village sits on the infant River Forth. The attractive main street is well served with individual shops, cafes, and restaurants. Learn more about the area at the Trossachs Discovery Centre and the Scottish Wool Centre which is also located in the village. The Lodge Forest Visitor Centre just a couple of miles up the road offers arguably the most spectacular views in the area, a fantastic play area, and a wildlife station with CCTV viewing of ospreys, blue tits and many more species.

Glen Affric-Dog Falls Circular Walk

Grade: Moderate

Terrain: Countryside

Distance: 6.4km | Approx. Time: 1:42 - 2:10 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 415

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

Dog Falls is a series of waterfalls on the River Affric, in Glen Affric in the Highlands of Scotland. The falls are within the Glen Affric National Nature Reserve. Glen Affric a beautiful Scottish glen, possessing great character and wilderness value. The area is home to golden eagles, deer, endangered wildcats and a large remnant of native woodland. A project run by the charity Trees for Life has planted 1.7 million native trees in the glen and at other locations where the decimated Caledonian Forest – a mosaic of Scots pine, birch, rowan, aspen and juniper – stood. If you’re into photography this spot is a must for taking some outstanding shots.

Coast

Langamull Beach, Mull

Grade: Easy

Terrain: Coast

Distance: 5.2km | Approx. Time: 1:10 - 1:30 hours

Ordnance Survey Map: Explorer 374

Ordnance Survey Digital Route Here.

Langamull Beach is one of Mull's best kept secrets, a remote and stunningly beautiful spot that can only be reached on foot. To complete this route, just head back on the same approach route. Mull is the second-largest island of the Inner Hebrides, after Skye. Tobermory was originally built as a fishing port in the late 18th century and is now the main town on Mull. It is a beautiful place with brightly painted buildings along the main street to the pier, and high woodland-fringed hills surrounding the bay. The town has a good variety of shops, hotels, and other accommodation and can be used as good base to explore the island. Ben More is the highest mountain and only Munro (mountains in Scotland that reach an elevation of 3,000 feet (910 m) or more) on the Island.

Add the paper map detailed in the route to your collection with 40% off all Ordnance Survey maps.?

Scotland is made for adventure. So where will you explore first? Share your snaps and tag us in your adventures using #mymillets.

Back to top

Related article

The Outdoors And Mental Health

The Outdoors And Mental Health

Getting out and observing nature is one of the most calming experiences you can have, and who doesn’t like feeling calm? We’ve outlined some of the benefits associated with an outdoor lifestyle, along with activity ideas for anyone looking for inspiration. Read more

Latest article

Outdoor Art: Colour In Your World

Outdoor Art: Colour In Your World

Kids just love to get creative (and messy) so set their imaginations free with a spot of outdoor art. It’s the perfect way to keep them busy during the school holidays without making the house untidy. Read more